So That's Where I Get It From

March 11, 2011

March 11 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

March 11   –   Do you have any female ancestors who died young or from tragic or unexpected circumstances? Describe and how did this affect the family?

My female ancestor Esther Read (1817 – 1842) is the great granddaughter of my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read.  Esther is one of a very large group of my ancestors from Quainton, Buckinghamshire, UK. 

Her parents are Steven Read (1782 – 1859) and his wife Ann (nee Lee) (1793 – 1853). 

There is not much I can discover about Esther Read.  In the 1841 Census (the year before she died aged only 25) she was living with her parents and siblings in Quainton.  Her father was a Publican.

I found a baptism for William Read in 1842, who was born to unmarried Esther Read.  Esther died in 1842 and I think that maybe she died as a result of having her son William.  I will get her death certificate to find out for sure how she died so young and also a birth certificate for William, just in case there is a clue as to his father, although I think that will be unlikely!!

I have not been able to discover yet what happened to Esther’s son but will keep on searching.

Sadly, for such a short life, there is not much to tell about poor Esther Read.

March 10 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

March 10   –   What role did religion play in your family? How did your female ancestors practice their faith? If they did not, why didn’t they? Did you have any female ancestors who served their churches in some capacity?

As far as I know religion has not played a significant role in my family.  We are C of E (Church of England) which is the Anglican denomination.  But we are not really churchgoers apart from attending Baptisms, Marriages and Funerals.  It’s not because we are not religious in any way.  We all have our own beliefs and as one family member puts it, “I don’t have to attend church to show my religious beliefs or pray”.

I have not really come across any particular females in my ancestors who were anything other than churchgoers.  I have several male ancestors who were Church Wardens for their churches.

But, there is one female ancestor, that I have already mentioned here in this theme for Women’s History Month for March 8th, who probably did serve her church in some capacity.  That is Annie Humphreys, whose diary extract I have mentioned in a post for March 8th and also under my menu for Pages, Old Documents.

In one of Annie’s extracts dated January 1866 she says: 

Jan.:  Went to a “Dorcas” Meeting at Stockwell Lane, a great many ladies present. Worked until 8.

Stockwell Lane is in Princes Risborough, Buckinghamshire, UK and as I did not know what a “Dorcas” Meeting was I looked it up on the internet.  The Wikipedia states the following:

Dorcas Society

A Dorcas Society is a local group of people, usually based in a Church, with a mission of providing clothing to the poor.

So it looks as though my ancestor Annie Humphreys did serve her church although I have no idea if she continued attending “Dorcas” Meetings, as I have not seen her Diary for myself.

March 9, 2011

March 9 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

March 9 – Take a family document (baptismal certificate, passenger list, naturalization petition, etc.) and write a brief narrative using the information.

I decided to show the Marriage Licence for my ancestor Betty Read who married Thomas Lovegrove.  Betty is the niece of my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read.

Here is a copy of the Marriage Licence:

Copy of original document in my private collection (obtained from the Oxfordshire Record Office) - copyright 2011

This is a transcript of the above document:

                                                                                  October 6th 1769

 Appeared personally Thomas Lovegrove and made oath that he is of the parish of Great Haseley in the County of Oxford of the Age of Thirty four years and upwards and a Batchelor And intends to intermarry with Betty Read of the same parish of the Age of Twenty Three years and upwards and a Spinster

 To this Deponent not knowing or believing any Lawful Lett or Impediment by reason of any Precontract entered into before the Twenty Fifth Day of  March 1754 consanguinity Affinity or any other lawful Means whatsoever to hinder the said intended Marriage and Prayed a Licence to Solemnize the same in the parish Church of Great Haseley Aforesaid and and further made oath that the usual place  of Abode of him this Deponent hath been in the said parish of Great Haseley for the space of Four Weeks last past

Same day

the said Thomas Lovegrove

was sworn to the truth hereof                                                 Thos. Lovegrove

Before me

             T. Cox T …(?)

Betty Read married Thomas Lovegrove on 7th October 1769, the day after Thomas signed this document.  I know Betty and her family were from around Great Haseley, Oxfordshire (which is where they married) and thought that Thomas’ family were also from there.  But this document shows he only lived in Great Haseley for the previous four weeks, obviously to get the Licence, so I wonder where he was living before.

This Licence also shows that Betty was only 23 when she married although Thomas was a bit older at 34 years old.  A fair sized gap in age between them!  Betty and Thomas went on to have 6 children and I am including two of their children in this week’s Wednesday’s Child post.

I have another document concerning Betty (Read) Lovegrove, a Discharge of Legacy, dated 1804 when she was now known as Betty Burgess, having married again after Thomas Lovegrove died.  I have shown this Discharge of Legacy previously on the blog (under the Pages section, Old Documents, Discharge of Legacy), but will show it again here as Betty is my female ancestor for this day and I have the two documents concerning her!

The Discharge of Legacy:

Copy of original document in my private collection - copyright 2011

 

And the transcript for this document:

We William Burgess of Great Haseley in the County of Oxford Labourer and Betty his Wife – one of the Nieces and Legatees named in the Last Will and Testament of Rachel Read late of Tiddington in the Parish of Albury in the same County Spinster deceased DO hereby acknowledge that we have this day had and received of and from Michael Read of Lower Winchendon in the County of Bucks – yeoman a Nephew and the Devisee named in the said Will of the said Rachel Read the full sum of Thirty Pounds in Satisfaction and Discharge of the Legacy of that amount which by the same Will is given to she the said Betty and directed to be paid within six calendar months next after the Testatrix’s Decease As Witness our Hands this 11th Day of May in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and four.

Betty Burgess

Witness, Edward Read; the mark X of William Burgess

 

Betty married William Burgess on 14th May 1796 at St. Martin’s, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK  (four years after Thomas Lovegrove died).  Betty and William did not have any children together.

Betty lived a long life for those days, 74 years and because it was the Discharge of Legacy for her that pointed me in the direction of many of my other ancestors, she has become rather special to me.  :-)

Update to March 7 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

When I was writing the post for March 7 in this series, for some reason WordPress were having some technical difficulties which were preventing the uploading of photographs to our blog posts.  So for that post I mentioned that I will add the photo later when I was able to.

This is just an update to say that I have now been able to upload the photograph I wanted to use for that post.  And it also means that I have slightly changed the wording of the post too.  :-)

March 8, 2011

March 8 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

March 8 – Did one of your female ancestors leave a diary, journal, or collection of letters? Share an entry or excerpt.

I was thinking that maybe I could not write something about this as we have no diaries, journals or anything like that from any female ancestors.  But, then I remembered that a few years ago a “new” cousin sent me extracts from the diary of one of our shared ancestors, Annie Humphreys. 

I actually have a transcript of the extracts here already on the blog under the Pages section – Old Documents – Transcript of Diary Extracts (where you will also find transcripts of the diary extracts of Annie’s husband John Hughes Cox) but I will show Annie’s diary extracts again here in this post as it is for this theme.

The Diary was that of Annie Humphreys (1843 – 1909) who later married John Hughes Cox (1841 – 1913) whom she writes about in some entries.  They married in 1866 at Haddenham Baptist Chapel, Haddenham, Buckinghamshire, UK. 

Extracts from the Diary of Annie Humphreys – 1864

July 1864: Mr. Edward Clark called and I saw the dear little baby for the first time. Mr. Wm. Clarke and Mr. Shrimpton called. Aunt and Uncle Rose from Eythrope drank tea and supped with us. John tells me his Mother is very poorly.

July 24th: At Lane End. Mr. Butcher there and Mr. Robert Munger. John and I went a walk to Bitchendon. The scenery is truly picturesque.

July 25th: John and I went through Leighton Buzzard to Woburn where we left the horse and chaise and walked in the park and gardens. We to Brogborough to Mr. Checkleys.

July 26th: John and I had a nice ride to Bedford. James Checkley living at Brogborough now.

July 28th: Returned to Lane End. Mr. and Mrs. Cox were gone to a party at Cranwell. I can truly say the more I see of my friends at Lane End the more I like them.

July 30th: Mrs. Cox of Bitchendon has kindly invited me to make one of her party at Velvet Lawn. Poor Mrs. Little has met with a sad accident by setting fire to herself.

Oct. 17th: Today I suppose Miss Dodwell has changed her name into Mrs. Rose. I hope they will be happy and think in all probability they will. I believe them to be much attached to each other.

Feb. 1865: John Rose from Aylesbury preached. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Clarke and John came. I think Mrs. Clarke such a very nice young lady. I really do not know where to look for her equal.

Jan.: Went to a “Dorcas” Meeting at Stockwell Lane, a great many ladies present. Worked until 8. Met Miss Carrie Clarke of Haddenham. Aunt from Pinner has persuaded Papa to have his likeness taken, so have been to Mr. Paynes, Aylesbury. Mr. W. Rose from Haddenham came.

That is all I have of extracts from Annie’s diary and so wish I had more.  The cousin who sent the above has sadly died and I know he had more extracts, a photo of Annie and John and other bits and pieces of great interest. 

I just don’t know if it would be the right thing to do to now ask his son what was done with my cousin’s genealogy research, photos, documents etc..  What do you think?  Should I ask?

March 7 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

March 7 – Share a favourite recipe from your mother or grandmother’s kitchen. Why is this dish your favorite? If you don’t have one that’s been passed down, describe a favorite holiday or other meal you shared with your family.

I’m sure over the years both my Mum and my Grandmothers cooked many wonderful meals for us but there hasn’t seemed to be any favourite recipes passed down to us!

So, I will mention here instead about one Christmas meal, about 1970-ish, that I won’t forget.  Here is a photo taken at that time:

Original photograph in my private collection - copyright 2011

 

The reason this meal was special is because it was at a time when my Aunt Winnie Tucker (nee Read) came for a visit from her home in Bermuda.  My dear Dad last saw his sister when he was about 11 years old or so and so for him this was a really special visit. 

The photo  shows my parents, my Grandfather John Read (who also was seeing his daughter for the first time in many many years), my brother John, (my other brother Alan was taking the photograph) and my cousin Heather (Aunt Winnie’s daughter), who was meeting us for the first time in her life, so, it was a very special and memorable meal for all of us.

(My Dad is at the end of the table, near the Christmas tree.  His sister (my Aunt Winnie) is next to him one side and his father (my Granddad) is sitting next to him the other side.  My cousin Heather is between my Grandad and myself and my brother John is sitting next to Aunt Winnie and my Mum is at the end of the table nearest the camera.  (On my lap is Susie, on Mum’s lap is Bobo and wandering about somewhere nearby was Dora – our three Poodles).

After the brief visit with Aunt Winnie, she went back to Bermuda and we have never seen her again.  Sadly she died a few years ago, but I am thrilled that I had the chance to meet her and Heather and also thrilled that I have one special photo to treasure of that very wonderful occasion.

March 7, 2011

March 6 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

March 6 – Describe an heirloom you may have inherited from a female ancestor (wedding ring or other jewelry, china, clothing, etc.) If you don’t have any, then write about a specific object you remember from your mother or grandmother, or aunt (a scarf, a hat, cooking utensil, furniture, etc.)

I have not inherited anything directly from my female ancestors as such, but over time have been given something that was theirs.  A few years after my maternal grandmother Lucy Sinclair (nee Dartnell) died my aunts gave me two English bone china cups and saucers that were from her best china.  These are very pretty, decorated with pink roses and gold rimmed, but very delicate.  Because they were my grandmother’s I treasure them.

Quite a few years after my paternal grandmother Jane Read (nee Stapleton) died I was given an ornament of hers that always sat in her kitchen.  I remember always seeing it there whenever we visited my grandparents and after she died it still lived in the kitchen. 

When my grandfather John William Read died it passed to my Dad and then he gave it to me several more years later.  What is it you may be wondering?  It’s about four inches high and is a plastic (I think) Mickey Mouse! 

My grandparents never travelled away from their home in London so it must have been bought by them in London, probably even before I was born.  As it is Mickey Mouse I think perhaps they had seen something to do with Walt Disney.   When I received it, unfortunately part of Mickey’s face is missing, but there is no doubt it is him!  So, as this belonged to my grandmother, I treasure it.

March 5 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

March 5 – How did they meet? You’ve documented marriages, now, go back a bit. Do you know the story of how your parents met? Your grandparents?

I asked my Mum about whether she knew of how her parents met or how my Dad’s parents met but she does not know any details!  Apart from my 100 year old Aunt Lucy, there really is no-one else I can ask anything regarding my grandparents on either side of the family.

But, although I knew some of the details of how my parents met, I asked Mum to tell me something of how she and my dear Dad met.  She happily chatted about their meeting.

She was working in an office as an accountancy clerk and my Dad came to work there as an electrician, with some other men, doing various things in the offices.  They worked there for a number of days and obviously Mum and Dad started chatting to each other.  It seems my Dad kidded my Mum on by telling her he was married with five children and Mum thought “oooh, I wouldn’t marry him”!   (I have no idea why Dad pretended this and neither does my Mum)!!  Mum had stopped seeing her last boyfried seven months before meeting my Dad and seemingly she was still very unhappy at this situation and must have told my Dad about it.

He also kidded her on saying that of course she will never meet someone else as all she could think of was the ex boyfriend.  At the end of each day, my Dad would wait for my Mum and walk her home from the office, so they chatted, and chatted and then after a while they stopped off for a cup of tea in a restaurant and chatted and chatted and so it went on from there.  They obviously started seeing each other as a couple and eventually married and had three children.  They were still together until the sad loss of my dear Dad when he was aged 58.

March 4 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

I’m a bit late again doing this and the next two posts for Women’s History Month.  Partly because I could not find the blog prompts, but I’ve sorted that now!!  Partly because yesterday I had some internet connection problems again.  So, onto the next post for this theme.

March 4 – Do you have marriage records for your grandparents or great-grandparents? Write a post about where they were married and when. Any family stories about the wedding day? Post a photo too if you have one.

I have a marriage certificate for my maternal 2 x great grandparents.  Lucy Cook married Robert Waterman Dickins in October 1852 at Trinity Church, St. Marylebone, London. (The actual day in October that they married is very unclear).

Copy Certificate in my private collection - copyright 2011

 

As this theme is more about our female ancestors I shall write here all that I know about my 2 x great grandmother Lucy Cook.  She is the daughter of Thomas and Jane (nee Prangnell) Cook and was born at East Tytherley in Hampshire, UK.  She was born about 1831 so was just about 21 years (or full age) as shown in the marriage details.  Lucy’s brother Silas and sister Elizabeth are witnesses to her marriage to Robert Waterman Dickins.

Lucy and her husband Robert only had one child, a daughter Lucy (as far as I can tell).

At the time of their marriage Lucy Cook was living in the “Trinity District” and her husband was living in Devonshire Place, London.

I don’t know of any family stories about their Wedding Day and as yet, have not come across any photos of either Lucy or Robert.

They married at Trinity Church, St. Marylebone (this is Holy Trinity Church) and because I did not know much about it, I searched for it on the internet and discovered that it became disused as a Church and was lately used as offices.  Now there are plans to turn it into a shopping arcade!

 I also found this photograph of it:

Copy photograph from BWCD Co. http://www.bwcd.co.uk

 

It does not look like the church has it’s roof any more.  I’m pleased I found this photo and can now picture where my 2 x great grandparents were for their big day.  I really hope this church does not get turned into a shopping arcade!!!

March 4, 2011

March 3 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

Filed under: FEARLESS FEMALES, MARCH - WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH — Tags: , — rootsresearcher @ 12:03 am

March 3 – Names and Naming Patterns

We are asked if we have a first name that we share with one of our female ancestors or perhaps we were named after our great grandmother or our name maybe follows a naming pattern.  If not, then we are asked to show the most unique or unusual female name we’ve come across in our family tree.

My name is Christine and although I was not named after any particular ancestor I almost share the name with that of my paternal side of the family ancestor Christianah Read born about 1835 in Aston Clinton, Buckinghamshire, UK.  Christianah is the 2 x great granddaughter of my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read.  Christianah married Samuel Flitney in 1856 at Aston Clinton and they had eight children.

I haven’t seen a particular naming pattern within my family although I think the ancestors from way back in the 1600s – early 1700s were doing something like a naming pattern.

I’m told by my parents that my dear Dad chose my name as he liked it and Mum agreed to it also so they went with that for me.

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