So That's Where I Get It From

March 16, 2011

March 15 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

March 15   -   Write a six-word memoir tribute to one of your female ancestors.

I’m a day late with writing this post, but I have been thinking and pondering and musing about which of my female ancestors I should write the six-word memoir about and wondering how I would write it!!  It’s not that easy!

I decided to feature my 6 x great grandmother Elizabeth Read (nee Shirley)(c1713 – 1786) for this tribute.  I have already mentioned her in this series but as she is the only ancestor of mine that had as many children as 20, then I think she was worth another mention.

Elizabeth was the wife of my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read and married him when she was about 21.  They married in 1734 at Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, UK  and lived for the rest of their lives at Lower Winchendon, Buckinghamshire.

 The six-word memoir requires me to sum up Elizabeth’s life in just six words.  I’ve thought and thought about this and here is my six-word memoir tribute to her:

Husband and eleven daughters, nine sons

From the day she married her life then revolved around her husband, having twenty children, seeing five of them die as babies or toddlers, not to mention the rearing that was required until they reached adulthood and went on to marry and have children themselves.  So I think my six-word memoir covers Elizabeth’s life quite well!!

March 14, 2011

March 14 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

March 14   -   Newsmakers? Did you have a female ancestor who made the news? Why? Was she famous or notorious? Did she appear in the social column?

I hate to say it, but I haven’t really come across any news item concerning any of my female ancestors whatever side of the family they are on, nor any of the female ancestors of my partner Paul.

Buuuuuut, there might just be a female ancestor who could be one of mine, but at the moment I have not found a connection.  I came across her a  long time ago and made a few notes, just in case she turned out to be one of my ancestors.  Her name is Mary Read and she was a pirate!  Apparently a very famous one.  She was born towards the end of the 1600s and died before the mid-1700s, probably to do with her career as a pirate.  I have not been able to discover too much about her birth/baptism and parents so at this stage she is only a “could be related but need to check more” name for me to be aware of.

I think as a pirate she probably wouldn’t have been too nice a person, but how fascinating if I eventually find she is my ancestor and have a pirate in the family!  (Why does this make me think of Johnny Depp)?  ;-)

There is more information about Mary Read at the Wikipedia website.

Amanuensis Monday: Will of Susana Reade of Steeple Claydon – 1661

Filed under: Amanuensis Monday, DAILY BLOGGING THEMES — Tags: , , , — rootsresearcher @ 11:16 pm

 

Amanuensis Monday is a blog theme started by John Newmark on his blog Transylvanian Dutch, in which he is transcribing letters, newspaper articles, audio tapes, and a war diary etc., concerning his family.

John explains Amanuensis as “a person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another”.

I’m not quite sure exactly how Susana Reade is related but my John Read born 1774 in Lower Winchendon, Buckinghamshire who is a grandson of my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read  married Elizabeth Read born 1789 in Quainton, Buckinghamshire in 1811 at Quainton who is the 3 x great granddaughter of Susana Reade whose Will I am posting about today.

Unfortunately for anyone researching this line, Susana is a widow at the time of writing her Will so all we know is that her husband was ? Reade!!  I haven’t yet found a marriage for any Reade (and variant spellings) who married a Susana at a time with dates that would fit what few dates I have for their children. 

It wasn’t until I was typing the transcript for this Will today, that I realised that Susana was seemingly known more as Anne as that name is written on the Will as her name, but then it is crossed through and replaced with Susana which presumably is her proper name so needed to be used for the Will.

Susana Reade’s Will:

Copy of original Will in my private collection - copyright 2011

 

Although I typed the transcript today, I was amazed at the number of words that I just couldn’t decipher.  Hopefully some eagle-eyed readers might be able to read it better than I can and fill in some of the (?) gaps in my transcript?

Transcript of Susana Reade’s Will:

In the name of God Amen This 12th Day of march in the year of our Lord God one thousand six hundred sixty and one I Susanes (Anne has been crossed out) Reade of Steeple Claydon in the County of Bucks widdow being at this time weake of body but of good and …(?) memory (blessed be God) Doo make and ordain this to be my last will and testament in manner and forme following ffirst I acknowledge my Sinns unto Almighty God my maker and trust through the …(?) and …(?) of Jesus Christ my Saviour to be saved(?) (and I commend my Soule in …(?) ffaith into his blessed hands that gave itt

Item I give unto my Sonne John Snow …(?) …(?) like wise I give unto Anne Hoalton my daughter …(?) …(?) Item I give unto my Sone Richard Reade my house and …(?) land at Rous…(?) which hee is ent …(?) in …(?) in that and to have it when hee turns(?) to one and twenty Item I give unto my Sonne Will: Reade a hoase and lande which was lately hoase of Henry Smith and hee shall have it when hee turns(?) too one and twenty Item I give unto my daughter Alice Reade widdowe pounds(?) of the monny(?) wich John Reade ooth and if it cane be …(?) and …(?) and …(?) and a …(?) and a …(?) yoke and …(?) and a …(?) …(?) and my best …(?) and …(?) …(?) and one …(?)

Item I give unto my daughter Betty Snow five pound and the tenn pounds wich Smith ooth me and a …(?) and a …(?)

Item I give unto my daughter Joane Wo…(?) five shilling and my …(?) …(?) …(?) …(?) 2s. 6d.

Item I give unto my grandchild Betty Hoalton 2s. 6d.

Item I make my Sonn Tho. Evens my full Executor of this my last will and testament (two or three words scribbled out) and to see my debts …(?) and all the rest of my goods I give to him in witness I have hereunto …(?) my hands and seale the day and yeare above written

John Triplett(?) Ann Harker(?) Susane Reade X her mark

I am now going to have to check Reade marriages to an Anne at the right time period in the hope that this turns up the name of the Reade that married Susana, as she may well have married as Anne. 

I haven’t had much luck finding the marriages of her daughters in Buckinghamshire so will widen the search to Oxfordshire next.

If you hear a big big cheer then you will know I’ve found Susana’s husband Reade!!  :-)

Surprises: Update on my long-lost cousin calling from New York

Filed under: My Cousin Heather, SURPRISES! — Tags: , , — rootsresearcher @ 12:24 am

Following my post about the surprise phone call from my long-lost cousin Heather who is in New York.  She phoned back!!  I’m so pleased that she did, as she did not leave a number for me to call her back.

We had a lovely looooooong chat for nearly two hours.  We covered so many things and have now arranged to phone each other once a month, taking it in turns to make the phone call.  I’m absolutely delighted and we have a good many years to catch up on.  :-)

March 13 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

March 13   -   Moment of Strength: share a story where a female ancestor showed courage or strength in a difficult situation.

I find this very difficult to answer!  I have no knowledge of anyone in the family having to be strong or show courage in a difficult situation.  I have always felt though that my 6 x great grandmother, Elizabeth Read (nee Shirley) (c1713 – 1786) must have been a very strong woman.

The reason for thinking this is because she had 20 children in an era when there was no medical help as such.  She married my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read in 1734, had their first child in 1735 and their last child twenty years later in 1755.  They had three sets of twins within those 20 children.

At a time when there would not have been medication to help ease the pain of childbirth, nothing much to help should she have had any infections and what if there were problems during the birth?  So to have endured all that over so many years and live to a good age of about 73 years, just makes me think she must have been so strong and I much admire her for all that.

I’ve been trying to think if I have come across any incidents that might have been difficult for my other female ancestors, and would suppose that many would have had to be strong, if not couragious, to just be able to live in those past times, when they were poor.  Some of them I see, from their death certificates, were still working as servants, or straw plaiters, or agricultural labourers even, when they were in their seventies and early eighties, much like their husbands, if they lived that long. 

I think we have it a bit easier these days and don’t really appreciate what our ancestors really went through.

March 13, 2011

March 12 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

March 12   -   Working girl: Did your mother or grandmother work outside the home? What did she do? Describe her occupation.

My maternal grandmother, Lucy Sinclair (nee Dartnell), worked as a Court dressmaker when she was young and in the early years of her marriage to my grandfather, Frederick Sinclair.  As far as I know she did not go out to work while bringing up her five children.  Because of her experience as a dressmaker, she made all her own clothes and clothes for her children.  She also knitted many items and continued to do so until she was in her nineties.  She lived to the ripe old age of 101 and was always active.

This is a digital scrapbook picture I made of my maternal grandmother and I have shown it previously elsewhere on this blog together with other ancestors for the Carnival of Genealogy – Scrapbooking Your Family History.

Original photographs in my private collection and digital scrapbook page made by me - copyright 2011

I have absolutely no knowledge as to whether my paternal grandmother, Jane Read (nee Stapleton) went out to work and know nothing at all about any work she may have done before her marriage to my grandfather, John Read.  Sadly there is no one left that I could ask about this.

This is another digital scrapbook page I made for my paternal Grandmother Jane and is the only photo I have of her.

Original photograph in my private collection and digital scrapbook page made by me - copyright 2011

My own mother, Jean (nee Sinclair) has always worked until she retired.  My two brothers and I were what people used to call “latch-key kids”.   Obviously she had some time off when she had each of  us, but when she was at work, as an Accountant, there was always someone we could go to after school until Mum and Dad picked us up when they returned from work.

Mum frequently brought work home with her and I was always amazed at just how quickly she could add up very long columns of figures.  She never used a calculator, it was all done in her head.  Maths was my worst subject at school and although I can add up in my head, I could never do it as quickly as my dear Mum. 

We never suffered or felt bad because Mum was working when we were younger.  We had a happy childhood and there are no regrets because she was working.  I think Mum would not have been happy to be a stay-at-home Mum and I know that if I had had children myself, I’m pretty sure I would not have been a stay-at-home Mum either.  I don’t think this has been detrimental in any way to my brothers and I that Mum worked all through our childhood.  I know at times it was hard for Mum going out to work and looking after her home and family but she did it and is now retired and enjoying the life she has now.

This is a pic of Mum aged about 17

Original photograph in my private collection - copyright 2011

 

And another of Mum as she is now, this photo taken in November 2010 at her sister Lucy’s 100th birthday party.

Original photograph in my private collection - copyright 2011

 

Three very special ladies in my life.  My two grandmothers I miss very much and my Mum I love very dearly.

March 12, 2011

Surprises: My long-lost cousin called from New York!!

Filed under: My Cousin Heather, SURPRISES! — Tags: , , — rootsresearcher @ 3:37 pm

ooooh Wow, my cousin Heather just phoned from New York, but I missed her!!  I didn’t get to the phone in time, so she left a message and suggested I call her or she will phone back.  Buuuuuuuuut, she didn’t leave her number!!!!!  :-(

It must be the 1970s or early 1980s when we last saw each other and last spoke to each other, so I was absolutely thrilled to find the message was from Heather.  I would have phoned her back straight away but …

I’m really hoping she will call back today.  I’m sure we will be having a terrific chat about things, I’m sooooooo looking forward to it.

I mentioned Heather and there is a photo in my March 7 post for the Women’s History Month – Fearless Females theme.  Perhaps it’s long-distance telepathy that made her get in touch today?  :-)

March 11, 2011

March 11 – Women’s History Month – Fearless Females

March 11   -   Do you have any female ancestors who died young or from tragic or unexpected circumstances? Describe and how did this affect the family?

My female ancestor Esther Read (1817 – 1842) is the great granddaughter of my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read.  Esther is one of a very large group of my ancestors from Quainton, Buckinghamshire, UK. 

Her parents are Steven Read (1782 – 1859) and his wife Ann (nee Lee) (1793 – 1853). 

There is not much I can discover about Esther Read.  In the 1841 Census (the year before she died aged only 25) she was living with her parents and siblings in Quainton.  Her father was a Publican.

I found a baptism for William Read in 1842, who was born to unmarried Esther Read.  Esther died in 1842 and I think that maybe she died as a result of having her son William.  I will get her death certificate to find out for sure how she died so young and also a birth certificate for William, just in case there is a clue as to his father, although I think that will be unlikely!!

I have not been able to discover yet what happened to Esther’s son but will keep on searching.

Sadly, for such a short life, there is not much to tell about poor Esther Read.

March 9, 2011

Wordless Wednesday: Dad’s Shipmates in 1945

Filed under: DAILY BLOGGING THEMES, Wordless Wednesday — Tags: , , , , — rootsresearcher @ 11:27 pm

I have two photos taken in 1945 that have been passed to me by my Mum, of my Dad and his shipmates from when he was in the Merchant Navy during WWII.

My dear Dad is the second from the right as you look at this photo, but is not in the second photo.  I would love to find out what happened to his shipmates and just wonder how I would begin to search for them?  The third pic is of the reverse of the second photograph where four of Dad’s friends have signed it.

Original photograph in my private collection - copyright 2011

 

Original photograph in my private collection - copyright 2011

 

Reverse of original photograph in my private collection - copyright 2011

Wednesday’s Child: Sister and Brother – Ann and Thomas Lovegrove

My ancestor Betty Read, the niece of my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read married Thomas Lovegrove in Great Haseley, Oxfordshire, UK  on 7th October 1769.  (Betty is my female ancestor for today’s March 9 post for Women’s History Month – Fearless Females).

She and Thomas had six children but sadly lost two of them.  Their daughter Ann was born in 1775 but died less than a year later in 1776.  In 1778 two years after Ann died, Betty and Thomas had a son Thomas (named after his father).  Sadly he died in 1790 aged 12 years old. 

Ann and Thomas junior are both buried at Great Haseley and when we visited the churchyard there it was amazing to find that nearly all the tombstones were completely unreadable through the ravages of time.  So we did not find exactly where Ann and Thomas (or any of my numerous ancestors) were buried, but we know they are there somewhere.  They won’t be forgotten.

Sadly for Betty, her husband Thomas died just two years after his son.

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