So That's Where I Get It From

February 21, 2011

Amanuensis Monday: Will of Francis Farmbrough dated 1801

Amanuensis Monday is a blog theme started by John Newmark on his blog Transylvanian Dutch, in which he is transcribing letters, newspaper articles, audio tapes, and a war diary etc., concerning his family.

John explains Amanuensis as “a person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another”.

Francis Farmbrough (1736 – 1810) was married to Rachael Read (1741 – 1818), the daughter of my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read.  As far as I have discovered, they had two children, Elizabeth and William, who are mentioned in Francis’ Will.

Original photograph taken by me from the Rose Family Tree Book in 2000 - copyright 2011

 This is a very poor quality photo, my apologies for that, but it is the only photo I have of this Coat of Arms.  It was drawn in the huge Rose Family Tree Book that I have mentioned elsewhere in the blog and how I wish I had a better photo!! 

Copy Will in my private collection (obtained from the Buckinghamshire Record Office) - copyright 2011

 

Two of the witness signatures are signed by family.  Jas. James is James James who was married to my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read’s granddaughter Catherine (and James James was the subject of my last Tombstone Tuesday post).   Joseph Rose is the husband of Cozens Read’s daughter Sarah.

Transcript of Will of Francis Farmbrough

I Francis Farmbrough late of Hartwell in the County of Buckingham but now of Aylesbury in the same County Yeoman Do make publish and declare this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following (that is to say) First I give and bequeath unto my dear wife Rachael Farmbrough for her life the use of so much of my Household furniture Linen and Household effects of every sort as she may think necessary to furnish her a House which I direct to be delivered to her as soon as convenient may be after my decease Also I give and bequeath unto my said dear wife One Annuity or clear yearly sum of Fifty pounds of lawful money of Great Britain to be paid and payable to her or her Assigns out of my Real and Personal Estates hereinafter given to my Son William by four equal quarterly payments on the twenty fifth day of March the twenty fourth day of June the twenty ninth day of September and the twenty fifth day of December in every year during the term of her natural life without any deduction or abatement whatsoever out of the same or any part thereof for Duties or otherwise the first quarterly payment thereof to begin and be made on such one of the said days as shall first happen after my decease Next I give and bequeath unto my dear daughter Elizabeth the wife of James Cooper the sum of Seven hundred pounds of lawful money of Great Britain and direct the same to be paid to her by my said Son William out of the said Real and Personal Estate hereinafter given to him within twelve Calendar months next after the decease of my said wife And as to All my Messuages Cottages Lands Tenements Hereditaments and Real Estate whatsoever and wheresoever And all the rest and residue of my Ready monies and Securities for Money Goods Chattels Rights Credits and Personal Estate and Effects whatsoever and wheresoever and of what nature or kind soever I give devise and bequeath the same and every part thereof respectively unto my dear Son William Farmbrough To hold the same Real Estates unto and to the use of my said Son William Farmbrough his Heirs and Assigns for ever And to hold the said Personal Estate unto him and his Executors Administrators and Assigns absolutely to and for his and their own use and benefit Subject nevertheless and I do hereby expressly charge all the said Real and Personal Estates with the payment as well of all my debts Funeral expences and the Charges of the Probate of this my Will and also of the said Annuity or Yearly sum of Fifty pounds to my said wife or her Assigns during her life in the proportions and on the days aforesaid and of the said Legacy or sum of Seven hundred pounds to my said daughter at the time aforesaid And I do hereby nominate constitute and appoint my said dear Son William Farmbrough sole Executor of this my last Will and Testament In Testimony whereof I the said Francis Farmbrough have hereunto set my Hand and Seal this Tenth day of July in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and one

Signed Sealed Published and declared by the above named Francis Farmbrough the Testator as and for his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in his presence at his request and in the presence of each other have subscribed our names as Witnesses thereto

 Jas. James

Joseph Rose

John Brooks

                                                                                                   F. Farmbrough

6th Oct. 1810  The Executor sworn as usual and that the personal Estate of the deceased is under 5000£  Before me

                                                                                                  W. Stockins Senr.

Francis’ son William was not married at the time of the Will being made, but he went on to marry shortly after that and have ten children.

February 20, 2011

Black Sheep Sunday: Edward Reed

This is my first Black Sheep Sunday post but I’m pretty sure it won’t be the last!!

I found a record this week at Find My Past (as I had been given a full subscription there as a Christmas present) and was surprised to find one of my ancestors in their Army Deserters (1828 – 1840) section!

There is only seemingly a transcript from an Index (much to my disappointment) but it seems that my Edward Reed of Great Haseley in Oxfordshire was a deserter.

The information is very brief showing a date of 13 Jan 1829 and he was aged 48 at this time and was in the 3rd Bat. Gren. Gds., but was a Labourer from Great Haseley, Oxfordshire.

I have no idea if the date of this transcript is the date he was tried as a deserter or whether this was when he was discharged or what it applies to.  There are no details as to why he deserted, how long he had been in his Battalion, how he was caught or anything that gives a clue to this episode in his life.

He is the son of Thomas Read (1752 – 1838) and his wife Elizabeth (nee Shepherd) (1746 – 1818) and is the grandnephew of my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read.

I had not been able to find out more about him until now with this information that  he became a soldier and ended up as a deserter.

Where do I start looking for further information about this?  Court Records?  Records for his Battalion?  Or the data provider of this information to Find My Past, the Manchester & Lancs Family History Society?  Or somewhere else?

I can see that I’ve got a bit of digging and delving to do with this and will update with any new information I find concerning Edward.

February 15, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday: James James

As with last week’s Tombstone Tueday, the photograph this week shows another Tombstone on the wall at St. Mary’s, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire. 

James James is the husband of Catherine Read (whose tombstone was featured last week).  (Catherine James (nee Read) is the granddaughter of my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read).

James James was a lawyer and was very well known in and around Aylesbury.  I have heard that he seems to have been a little naughty with client’s money, but don’t know the truth of that rumour and I am still trying to discover more about it!!

Original photograph taken by me a few years ago - copyright 2011

 

Transcript of Monumental Inscription for James James

Beneath are deposited the Remains of

JAMES JAMES, Gentleman

who died the 7th of December 1808

Aged 39 Years

And of JOHN, one of the Sons

of the said JAMES JAMES

by CATHERINE his first wife;

who died the 8th of August 1800

Aged 3 Years and 7 Months

Also of ELIZABETH his widow who departed this Life

the 12th of May 1830 Aged 63 Years

And of their Son JOHN who departed this Life the 11th of May 1813

Aged 5 Years and 10 Months

 

I was very pleased to find this tombstone as it gave the information that James James had married again after Catherine died.  I know from Catherine’s Uncle Michael’s Will dated 1820 that she had 3 sons with James James.  I have only found two, John and James.  I don’t know anything about James James’ second wife Elizabeth apart from what is mentioned on this tombstone.  I don’t know if the son John he had with Elizabeth was their only child or if there are more children.

It seems I have a fair bit of investigating to do concerning this family group, as well as looking into the rumours about what James James really did!!

February 8, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday: Catharine James (nee Read)

 

For Tombstone Tuesday today I am not actually showing a tombstone in a graveyard. 

This tombstone for Catharine James (nee Read) sits on a wall inside St. Mary’s Church at Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire.

Catharine is the granddaughter of my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read.  Her father is Robert Read and it is through Robert’s line that I am descended.

Tombstone of Catharine James (nee Read)

Original photograph taken by me in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire - copyright 2011

 

In Memory

of

Catharine

wife of

James James

who departed this Life

15th April 1796

in the 27th Year

of her Age

 

Apart from her baptism, marriage to James James and her death and burial I really don’t know any more about Catharine.  I shall continue to delve into records to see if I can find out more about her.  Just so sad that she died at such a young age.

February 7, 2011

Amanuensis Monday: William Read’s Stolen Shirts

Amanuensis Monday is a blog theme started by John Newmark on his blog Transylvanian Dutch, in which he is transcribing letters, newspaper articles, audio tapes, and a war diary etc., concerning his family.

John explains Amanuensis as “a person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another”.

Today I am going to transcribe  a document other than a Will.  This document is about statements given when William Read (1679 – 1752), my 7 x great grandfather, had his best shirts stolen from a hedge where they had been drying!!

Original document – dated 1735

Copy of original document in my private collection (obtained from the Oxfordshire Record Office) - copyright 2011

I love the picture this document conjures up of the thief running away but also giving us a little view of how life was in those days.  We hang our laundered clothes on washing lines, it just seems strange to think in those days everyone laid their clothes on hedges to dry.  Must have been quite a picture.

Transcript – William Read’s stolen shirts – 1735

Oxfordshire

to wit

The examination of William Read of ye parish of Wheatfield in the sd County Yeoman taken upon oath before Ric: Carter Esq one of his Majestys Justices of ye peace for ye sd County this 24 of February in ye year of our Lord 1735.

This Examinant saith that upon the three and twentyth of ye instant February this Examinant lost from off a hedge near the dwelling house of ye Examinant in Wheatfield aforsd, two ……..(?) shirts of the value of six shillings or thereabout to the best of the Examinants knowledge or belief,

Oxfordshire

to wit

The examination of John Cox of Wheatfield in ye sd County servant boy, taken upon oath before Ric: Carter Esq one of His Majestys Justices of the peace for ye County aforsd this 24 of February in the year of our Lord 1735.

This Examinant saith that upon the 23rd of ye instant February his Mistress the wife of ye sd. Wm. Read after a washing hung out several shirts ……(?) & pillow bag upon a hedge near the dwelling house of ye sd Will Read his Master, and between ….(?) & Elavan a clock in the morning of ye sd 23 of f instant and(?) being near the sd house saw John Cornish take off several shirts from off ye hedge, and then run away with them towards Hazely, by the way of Latch ford …(?) …(?) in the parish of Tetsworth(?) in the sd County(My Note here: The following sentence has a line crossed through it: “the Sonne of ye Widow Cornish of Tetsworth in the sd County”).

Oxfordshire

to wit

The examination of Charles Cornish of Latchford the son of ye Widow Cornish of Latchford (My Note here: 2 words are crossed out here) …(?) in the parish of Tetsworth taken upon oath before Ric: Carter Esq one of his Majestys Justices of ye peace this 24 of February 1735.

This examinant saith that he saw John Cox a servant boy to Will Read of Wheatfield in ye sd County about Elevan a clock in the morning of ye 23rd instant stript(?) in his shirt (running after a (My Note here: the word “John” is crossed out here) man who had stolen his masters Linen(?), as this examinant hath given his ….(?) (My Note here: three words crossed out here – possibly “and that some”(?)) but the sd Jo. Cox (My Note here: The following sentence has been crossed out here: “running a different way from this examinants mothers house …(?)” ) …..(?) of Jo. Cornish, who very soon after came by this Examinants mothers house.

Wheatfield Church (I don’t have other pics of Wheatfield)

Original photograph taken by me at Wheatfield - copyright 2011

This church is in the middle of fields and the day we went, there were cows in the same field.  Barbed wire surrounds the church so that the animals don’t get into the churchyard!!  Somewhere around about the church would be the hedges that William Read’s shirts were drying on and stolen from!!  Wish I had a photo of THE hedge!!  ;-)

As yet, I have still to find out what happened about this case!!

February 5, 2011

Surname Saturday: Lavender

I’m not sure yet how this surname of Lavender fits in with my family history, but it is linked to the family of “Digby” Daniel Read whose exact connection with my family I am still investigating.

For those following my blog you will know that I refer to Daniel Read as “Digby” because for a long time I did not know his first name, seeing only Dg or Dy in a document so I gave him that nickname.

Anyway “Digby” Daniel (1731 – 1771) born at Hardmead, Buckinghamshire had a brother called Lavender Read (1734 – 1770) also born at Hardmead, Buckinghamshire (I just so love that name).  I always wondered where the Lavender part came from and have found a few of my Reads have a first name taken from their mother’s maiden name.  So I was thinking that Lavender Read was named after perhaps his mother, grandmother, someone else?

After a bit of ferreting around I also discovered the Will of “Digby” Daniel’s father (also called Daniel) ‘s brother Edward of Hardmead, Buckinghamshire.  Edward Read’s Will was dated 13th March 1733 and proved 21st October 1734.  Edward has three witnesses to his Will and, surprising for me, one of them is Elizabeth Lavender!   So I began to wonder, is Elizabeth Lavender family or a friend and is she or someone in her family why Lavender Read was so named.

Daniel Read senior and his brother Edward had a sister Elizabeth, so I wondered if she had married a Lavender.  But on investigating this further, Elizabeth married Robert Yorke in 1719 at Hardmead, Buckinghamshire so she’s not the one with a connection to the Lavenders.

Daniel senior (brother to Edward and father to “Digby” Daniel) married Rebeka but I have no idea what her surname is.  I have searched throughout Buckinghamshire, Oxfordshire and Hertfordshire and many places in London for Daniel Read senior’s marriage to Rebeka but no luck at all in finding it.  I wondered if she was a Lavender, hence naming one of their sons with that surname.  Still I have no idea.

Daniel senior’s own father was also Daniell Reade and he was born in Moulsoe, Buckinghamshire but he and his wife Sarah Hootton had their children at Hardmead and Daniel and  Sarah both died at Hardmead.  The family are also linked to Emberton, Buckinghamshire so I have searched these places in particular for Lavenders.

After a good few years of searching I am no nearer to finding out who Lavender Read is named after and how the Lavender family are connected to “Digby” Daniel Read’s family.

I’m sure I will find the answer one day, I am a very patient person!!  ;-)

February 3, 2011

Treasure Chest Thursday: Made By My Dad For His Mum

For this Treasure Chest Thursday I thought it would be nice to show the picture my dear Dad Kenneth Read (1924 – 1982) made for his Mum Jane Read nee Stapleton (1887 -1956) many years ago.  I’m not sure when it was made but more than likely about 1942 or thereabouts.

My Dad was in the Merchant Navy and joined up when he was 16 (he lied about his age to them)!  He made this picture using foil from sweetie wrappers and glass – I can’t tell if the glass has been painted black or if there is a black sheet of paper for the background – and his Mum treasured it.

Original item made by K. W. Read is in my private collection - copyright 2011

 

As far as I can tell, Dad wrote something like All My Love on his photo and finished it off with red tape around the edges.

I saw it for the first time about three years ago and that was when my Mum gave it to me to keep.  She knew I would treasure it.  I only wish I had known of it before then.  Perhaps I saw it as a child at my Grandmother’s but I really don’t remember if that was so.  I love it now and think it was a wonderful gift for a merchant seaman to give to his Mum for when he was away from home.

February 1, 2011

Tombstone Tuesday: How Many Tears Have Bathed Thy Honoured Bier

Now that I have the awful internet connection problem fixed, although not quite 100% yet, this is my first Tombstone Tuesday for quite a while!!

This is the tombstone of Michael Read, the great grandson of my 6 x great grandfather Cozens Read.

original photograph taken by me at Lower Winchendon, Buckinghamshire – copyright 2011

Transcript of Monumental Inscription

In

Memory of

Michael, Son of

Richard and Sarah Read

who died October 20th 1844

Aged 26 years

_______________

Oh friend, for ever lov’d, for ever dear,

How many tears have bathed thy honoured bier,

What sighs reechoed to thy parting breath,

Whilst thou wast struggling in the fangs of death

_______________

Afflictions semblence bends not o’er thy tomb,

Afflictions self deplores thy youthful doom,

To all save one, is consolation known,

Whilst solitary friendship sighs alone

 

Layt Aylesbury

 

I’m a little intrigued by the verse, the last part of the verse especially.  “To all save one …”   does that mean God or someone Michael was unfriendly with?  And what does “whilst solitary friendship sighs alone” mean?

Other than knowing that Michael died in London (it mentions this in the burial register) although the gravestone does say he was  late of Aylesbury (Buckinghamshire) I do not have much more information about him.  I am thinking that maybe I really need to get his death certificate, at least that will give me an idea of why he died so young. 

 

Amanuensis Monday: The Will and Inventory of Katharine Read – 1713

Filed under: Amanuensis Monday, DAILY BLOGGING THEMES — Tags: , , — rootsresearcher @ 12:06 am

Amanuensis Monday is a blog theme started by John Newmark on his blog Transylvanian Dutch, in which he is transcribing letters, newspaper articles, audio tapes, and a war diary etc., concerning his family.

John explains Amanuensis as “a person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another”.

The Will I am transcribing today is that of my 8 x great grandmother Katharine Read (nee Lovjoy).  She was born in Caversham, Oxfordshire in 1649, married John Read in Caversham in 1669 and they had 8 children.  Katharine was buried in January 1713 also at Caversham, so she spent all her 64 years in the one place!

The Will of Katharine Read

 

Copy of Will (obtained from the Oxfordshire Record Office) in my private collection - copyright 2011

 

 

and the

Inventory of the Goods and Chattells of Katherine Read – 1715

Copy of Inventory (obtained from the Oxfordshire Record Office) in my private collection - copyright 2011

 

 Transcript of the Will of Katharine Read  -  1713

In ye name of God Amen I Catherine Read of the parish of Caversham in the County of Oxon widdow being weake of body but of sound and perfect memory praised be God And to avoid all difficulty that may happen to Arise amongst my Children after my decease concerning my Goods and Chattels which I shall leave be-hind me do make this my last Will and Testament in writing forsaking all other Wills whether written or nuncupative heretofore by me made And this is my last Will as followed. ffirst I comend my Soul to Almighty God who gave it Trusting and hopeing for Everlasting salvation Through the merits of Jesus Christ my Redeemer and my Body to be Buryed by my Executors herein-after mentioned ffirst my will is that my Executor herein-named shall pay the several Legacies following within Two Years after my decease; ffirst, I give and bequeath to my son John Read the sum of  Ten Pounds of Lawfull money of Great Brittain. Item I give and bequeath to my daughter Katherine Glover wife of Will: Glover the sum of Ten Pounds Ittem I give and bequeath to my daughter Rachel Butts wife of John Butts the sum of one shilling Item I give and bequeath to my son Will: Read the sum of one shilling. Item I give and bequeath to my daughter Mary White wife of William White the sum of one shilling Ittem I give and bequeath to my daughter Ann Read the sum of Ten Pounds of like Lawfull money And I doe make my son Edward Read ffull and Sole Executor of this my last Will and Testament And I doe give and bequeath unto my said son Edward Read all my Goods and Chattles of which nature and kind soever besides what is as above disposed of In Witness whereof I ye said Katherine Read have hereunto set my hand and seal the 16 day of December 1713 and in the Thirteenth year of Queen Ann of Great Brittain.

Signed sealed published and declared by the sd  Katherine Read to be her last Will and Testament in ye presence of All ye Blanks first filled up

Tho. Brigham

…… (?) Brigham
Catherine Read

 

her mark

Probat  21 May 1715 …

and the transcript of the Inventory for Katharine Read – 1715

An Inventory of the Goods and Chattells

of Katherine Read widdow lately deceast

of the Parish of Cavarsham alias Casum

in the County of Oxon Taken & apraised

by us whose names are hereunto subscribed

as followeth

Imprims Her Apparrell          05 – 00 – 00

Item in money                            00 – 07 – 00

                                                           05 – 07 – 00

John Bishop

John Norman

His mark

Exhibiter 21 May 1715

p Edwardum Read filium Tr.

January 26, 2011

Wordless Wednesday: We May Have Found Something!

Filed under: DAILY BLOGGING THEMES, Wordless Wednesday — Tags: , , — rootsresearcher @ 11:42 pm
Ooooooo, what’s this?
My dear Dad, Ken Read (1924 – 1982) in his garden with lifelong family friend Roy.  They had a great day with a metal detector and just may have found something!  This was in the 1970s.
My dear Dad (1924 - 1982) and lifelong family friend Roy - 1970s

Photo in my private collection - Copyright 2011

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